Cherry and White Week Begins

Great job by Temple on the video. Still irked that the horsecollar against Tyler Matakevich in the Penn State game was never called.

If you cannot get pumped up for C&W by watching the above video, it might be wise to check for a pulse. From a personal standpoint, as a big fan of both the Owls and SEPTA regional rail, it will be great to make the one-mile walk to my regional rail station and get off at 10th and Diamond on Saturday morning.

You can never tell much from these games.

Years ago, a running back named Ventres Stevenson had a career day at C&W day. Years later, another back, Myron Myles, had 187 yards and three touchdowns at C&W day and ended his career at Millersville. Stevenson became a serviceable Owl but there were a lot of guys who had their best days in what is essentially a practice. Wearing the Orange jersey, Vaughn Charlton always looked good. Against a rush, not so much. Adam DiMichele always had a so-so C&W Day; when the lights came on, though, there was no one better in “real games” against a rush. … against a rush, and that includes Maxwell Award-winner quarterback Steve Joachim. Finding those kind of guys is like finding a golden nugget.

Still, the best you can hope for is a glimpse of what the talent can bring to the table when the lights go on. There won’t be 99,000 there, but this is my team (and presumably yours) and that should be all that matters.

Cherry and White Day All About Beating Penn State

While researching a story about Stan Hochman, I came across this story I wrote in 1986 for a chain of newspapers. Still chasing the dream almost 30 years later.

While researching a story about Stan Hochman, I came across this story I wrote in 1986 for a chain of newspapers. Still chasing the dream almost 30 years later. 

Having watched Cherry and White Day games at Temple Stadium (both when it was standing and after it was demolished), Lincoln Financial Field (once), Geasey Field (several times) and now at the E-O, the meaning this year as never been more clear.

Beat Penn State.

While ostensibly the reason for spring practice is to get ready for the season as a whole, the focus can be on this one game this time because it is the opening one.

That’s not to say the Owls can’t have a great season if they lose to Penn State, but they would be changing life-long perceptions by winning this game. Ever since sports talk radio began a generation ago, talk show hosts in Philadelphia laughingly dismissed the notion that Temple could ever beat Penn State.

Last year, a Penn State talker, Mike Missanelli, openly asked, “Is this the year Temple finally beats Penn State?” His producer, Jon Marks, a Temple grad said, “no, that’s never going to happen.” Missanelli said, “Yeah, I was just messing with you.”

That’s the kind of perception both Penn Staters and Philadelphians have about this game. It’s the kind of perception they always have had.

It will always be that way until Temple decides to put Christian Hackenberg on his ass as many times as it put three Vanderbilt quarterbacks on their ass a year ago.

It can happen, but until it does, the Owls will be still chasing that dream.

Another Friend of Temple Football Passes

Stan Hochman wrote some of his best columns about Temple football.

Stan Hochman wrote some of his best columns about Temple football.

While the other guys I played basketball with on the sloped courts at my grade school in Northeast Philadelphia had Mickey Mantle, Willie Mays and Richie—yes, we called him Richie then—Allen for boyhood heroes, I had guys like Sandy Grady, Frank Dolson and Stan Hochman.

They would talk about the great catches or the long home runs. I would talk about the turning of a phrase or a strong take on an issue.

Stan writing about his Wayne Hardin column. and wishing he could have kept the stories Wayne told about the Continental Football League champion Philadelphia Bulldogs in the column.

Stan writing about his Wayne Hardin column. and wishing he could have kept the stories Wayne told about the Continental Football League champion Philadelphia Bulldogs in the column.

Now, with Stanley’s passing at the age of 86, I have not only lost a hero but someone I got to know as a friend and someone who was a friend of Temple football.  Of the three great Philly sports columnists, only Stan was a friend of Temple football. (The other two guys pretty much wanted the school to drop the sport.) Stan always felt there was room for a big-time college team in the city and wanted Temple to thrive, particularly at the box office.

As an active and credentialed (if that means anything) sportswriter with the Doylestown Intelligencer and Philadelphia Inquirer, I got to know Stan because he was one of the few guys who would show up with me in a largely empty press box at Veterans Stadium to cover some Temple games. Stan wrote some of his best stuff on Temple football, lately writing about a guy (appropriately enough named Doolittle) who was working on a never released movie about Temple football fans and later about Wayne Hardin’s attempt to fill the stadium for an Al Golden-Era Temple game. As always, Stan’s emails were full of wit and I thought it was an extra good day when I got one.

Related:

http://articles.philly.com/2007-08-21/sports/24995401_1_temple-campus-wayne-hardin-navy

https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=2002&dat=19971116&id=Xe1fAAAAIBAJ&sjid=I7YFAAAAIBAJ&pg=5562,3515204&hl=en