Two Weeks to Get Something (Different) Done

This is what Temple fans have been seeing all year, no separation between the wr (left) and the corner.

This is what Temple fans have been seeing all year, no separation between the wr (left) and the defender.

When it comes to people saying intelligent things, it’s hard to beat what Albert Einstein once said about the definition of insanity being doing something over and over again and expecting a different result.

If Temple loses out, and I think the chances of that happening are about even right now, that quote will be the story of the season—at least on the offensive side of the ball. For 10 games, the Owls have gotten no wide receiver separation and no quarterback protection from their three- and four-wide receiver sets, yet go through the “process” of sticking with those ill-advised formations in the hopes the process eventually clicks. Newflash: It’s not going to click.

In this photo, the left side of the Owl line is doing a good job blocking, but things break down on the right for P.J. when one guy cannot hold his block. Why not establish the run first to the left, then give P.J. time to throw with play action? Mystifying.

In this photo, the left side of the Owl line is doing a good job blocking, but things break down on the right for P.J. when one guy cannot hold his block. Why not establish the run first to the left, then give P.J. time to throw with play action? Mystifying. P.J. has no time and is sacked by No. 91.

After 10 games of futility, I do not see this process leading to different results. Two weeks to try something different. Max protect for a beleaguered—yet very talented—quarterback and give him some time to throw down the field. Establish at least a semblance of running. Throw off play action to give the receivers a chance at separation. Make some of the LBs and safeties come up to support the run and then dump the ball over their heads to for big run-after-catch opportunities.

Almost two weeks to get something done. Something different, not more insanity in Games 11 and 12 that we saw in 1-10.

Albert Einstein would no doubt approve.

In this photo, Temple rushes so few players against Hackenburg, 6 PSU blockers can occupy 3 Temple rushers. Ugh. Must be part of the "process." The passive approach on defense opened up the "A" gap for No. 22 and he has a big gain on this play.

In this photo, Temple rushes so few players against Hackenburg, 6 PSU blockers can occupy 3 Temple rushers. Ugh. Must be part of the “process.” The passive approach on defense opened up the “A” gap for No. 22 and he has a big gain on this play.

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7 thoughts on “Two Weeks to Get Something (Different) Done

  1. OK, so how come the LBs and DBs after seeing the handoff don’t come up quicker to stop the runner? And the O picture of a Temple O-lineman missing his block underscores your argument that if there was a fullback in the backfield blocking he would have (supposedly) taken care of the defensive guy coming in. But all in all, the bottom line is that there are changes that need to be made and if the HC and coordinators don’t make the changes and win when they should, what are the consequences to them. I mean what is the protocol for the chain of command. If there’s so much on the line, as has been alluded to in these comments, shouldn’t the AD do something proactive and even the President and BOT at least “influence” some action? Seems like the whole situation at Temple is what holds them back. Again, Rhule should look at what Frank Beamer did at VA Tech to right the ship and turn that program around into the success it has been for a long time now – he made massive coaching changes when his job was on the line. Why does Temple allow such low level mediocrity to go on and on?

    • The only issue I’m currently wrestling with is who deserves more of the blame: Rhule or Satterfield. We are ranked 6th out of 11 in our conference. I encourage you all to use a simple excel graph and plot the number of points we’ve scored compared to our competitors each week. That graph will tell a chunk of the story. It’s been over 5 games since we’ve scored more than 20 points. Out of 10 games our opponents have only scored less than 20 points on 5 occasions.

      The problem is our offense. Behind closed doors I don’t know who is sticking with the terrible 3-4 wide sets. Is Satterfield crying out for runs while Rhule says no? Is Rhule not confident enough to say no to Satterfield? Or are both just in cahoots on a terrible scheme?

      Mike I agree with everything you said in your article. Question is will either of these two bozos get fired? Doubt it. It’s likely part of the process.

      • Rhule is the CEO. He’s the one who “allowed” Satterfield to go back into his favorite 3-4 wide sets after 2 backs beat ecu. He talked a lot about a commitment to the run between the loss to ucf and the win over ecu. Does any reasonable person feel he followed through with that commitment AFTER ECU? No. He’s the one who could have demoted Satterfield to wr coach (heck, he could have used the word reassigned to soften the blow), promote adm to qb coach and told the media he was talking over the temple offense and remolding it in the temple tuff image of al golden (tailback running behind fullback blocks), plenty of max protect for qbs, using the tight end on simple easy-peezy rollout passes and play action to create separation for wide receivers. None of that happened because he is “too nice a guy” to hurt the “feelings” of a friend. None of that is going to happen, unfortunately. If it does happen, Temple wins the next two games. If it doesn’t, it risks losing out. I don”t think it risks losing out by going back to the al golden offense rhule and adm were so much a part of during what should have been three-straight bowl seasons.

      • Ben, not just scoring. Prior to the Memphis game I started running a comparison of all offensive stats, 2013 vs 2014 season to date. Total offense, passing yards per game, rushing yards per game, 3rd down conversions, etc. Across the boards all categories are down compared to last year, some dropping off a good rate and near the bottom of all FBS schools. Total offense, 116th, Team Passing Efficiency 116th, Third Down Conversions 125, I believe these ranks are out of 125 FBS schools!!

    • Jon, making coaching changes, maybe not massive, seems par for the course at almost every program except Temple. Schiano just to “tweak” his staff all the time during his tenure at Rutgers or at least seemed to instill an attitude that jobs were constantly on the line.

  2. Perfect example of the incompetence of the coaches is the little use of the tight ends. In both of the last two games, passes to the tight end on play action worked and yet they ran it once in both games. As I pointed out in earlier comments, the spread has many more formations and plays than those displayed by TU. I would really like to know why there are no slants, draws, screens two back sets etcetera.

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